A. R. Ammons Net Worth

A. R. Ammons was born on February 18, 1926 in North Carolina, United States, is Poet. Multiple award winning American poet Archie Randolph Ammons, better known as A. R. Ammons, was famous for his works describing the wonders of nature and humanity’s complex and often unfortunate interactions with the natural elements. He was considered a major poet in the history of American literature, and this was a fact that continued to amaze him for long. For he never wrote to gain fame or fortune, he wrote only for the love of poetry. Yet his poems were so moving and thought provoking that fame and recognition became inevitable. As a poet he never felt the need to adhere to any set genre even though his writings were greatly influenced by those of the great poet Ralph Waldo Emerson who himself never followed any set tradition. Ammons loved to write from a young age and his works reflected his experiences of growing up in a cotton and tobacco farm as a youngster. Even though he was highly talented, success did not come easily to him. The very first book he wrote sold only 16 copies over a period of five years! It took him ten more years and a lot of struggles before he could taste success. Literary critics today consider him to be one of the greatest nature poets in American history.
A. R. Ammons is a member of Writers

Age, Biography and Wiki

Who is it? Poet
Birth Day February 18, 1926
Birth Place North Carolina, United States
Age 94 YEARS OLD
Died On February 25, 2001(2001-02-25) (aged 75)\nIthaca, New York
Birth Sign Pisces
Occupation poet, columnist, essayist
Education Wake Forest University University of California, Berkeley

💰 Net worth: Under Review

Some A. R. Ammons images

Famous Quotes:

The colon permits him to stress the linkage between clauses and to postpone closure indefinitely.... When I asked Archie about his use of colons, he said that when he started writing poetry, he couldn't write if he thought "it was going to be important," so he wrote "on the back of used mimeographed paper my wife brought home, and I used small [lowercase] letters and colons, which were democratic, and meant that there would be something before and after [every phrase] and the writing would be a kind of continuous stream."

Awards and nominations:

During the five decades of his poetic career, Ammons was the recipient of many awards and citations. Among his major honors are the 1973 and 1993 U.S. National Book Awards (for Collected Poems, 1951-1971 and for Garbage); the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets (1998); and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1981, the year the award was established. A school in Miami, Florida, was named after him.

Ammons's other awards include a 1981 National Book Critics Circle Award for A Coast of Trees; a 1993 Library of Congress Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry for Garbage; the 1971 Bollingen Prize for Sphere; the Poetry Society of America's Robert Frost Medal; the Ruth Lilly Prize; and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1978.

Biography/Timeline

1949

Ammons grew up on a tobacco farm near Whiteville, North Carolina, in the southeastern part of the state. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, stationed on board the U.S.S. Gunason, a battleship escort. After the war, Ammons attended Wake Forest University, majoring in biology. Graduating in 1949, he served as a principal and Teacher at Hattaras Elementary School later that year and also married Phyllis Plumbo. He received an M.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley.

1962

Ammons had been a longtime resident of the South Jersey communities of Northfield, Ocean City and Millville, when he wrote Corsons Inlet in 1962.

1964

In 1964, Ammons joined the faculty of Cornell University, eventually becoming Goldwin Smith Professor of English and Poet in Residence. He retired from Cornell in 1998.

1973

During the five decades of his poetic career, Ammons was the recipient of many awards and citations. Among his major honors are the 1973 and 1993 U.S. National Book Awards (for Collected Poems, 1951-1971 and for Garbage); the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets (1998); and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1981, the year the award was established. A school in Miami, Florida, was named after him.

1981

Ammons's other awards include a 1981 National Book Critics Circle Award for A Coast of Trees; a 1993 Library of Congress Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry for Garbage; the 1971 Bollingen Prize for Sphere; the Poetry Society of America's Robert Frost Medal; the Ruth Lilly Prize; and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1978.