André Lwoff Net Worth

André Lwoff was born on May 08, 1902 in Ainay-le-Château, Allier, Auvergne, France, French, is Microbiologist. André Michel Lwoff was a French microbiologist, geneticist and protozoologist, who received the ‘Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine’ in 1965 along with two French biologists François Jacob and Jacques Monod for his contributions in the discoveries regarding genetic control of enzyme and synthesis of virus. Together with Jacob and Monod he contributed in comprehending the lysogeny or the lysogenic cycle mechanism where bacteriophage, a bacterial virus, causes infection to bacteria which is then transferred to succeeding generations of bacteria entirely by way of cell division of its host. He showed that the infection is passed on in a non-infective form, which is called a prophage. He also showed that the prophage under some conditions engender an infective form that results in lysis or breaking down of the membrane of the bacterial cell and the viruses thus released due to such disintegration can infect other hosts of bacteria. He had done significant research on poliovirus, microbiota and bacteriophages at the renowned ‘Pasteur Institute’ of France where he served as departmental head. He received several honours and awards including the ‘Leeuwenhoek Medal’ from the ‘Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences’ in 1960 and the ‘Grand Prix Charles-Leopold Mayer’ from the French ‘Académie des Sciences’ in 1964. His written works include ‘Problems of Morphogenesis in Ciliates’ (1950) and ‘Biological Order’ (1962).
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Age, Biography and Wiki

Who is it? Microbiologist
Birth Day May 08, 1902
Birth Place Ainay-le-Château, Allier, Auvergne, France, French
Age 118 YEARS OLD
Died On 30 September 1994(1994-09-30) (aged 92)\nParis, France
Birth Sign Gemini
Alma mater Pasteur Institute
Known for Provirus
Spouse(s) Marguerite Lwoff
Awards ForMemRS (1958) Nobel Prize in Medicine (1965) Leeuwenhoek Medal (1960)
Fields Microbiology
Institutions University of Cambridge Max Planck Institute for Medical Research Pasteur Institute

💰 Net worth: Under Review

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Awards and nominations:

He was awarded numerous prizes from the French Académie des Sciences, the Grand Prix Charles-Leopold Mayer, the Leeuwenhoek Medal of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1960 and the Keilin Medal of the British Biochemical Society in 1964. He was awarded a Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1965 for the discovery of the mechanism that some viruses (which he named proviruses) use to infect bacteria. Throughout his career he partnered with his wife Marguerite Lwoff although he gained considerably more recognition. Lwoff was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (ForMemRS) in 1958.

Biography/Timeline

1932

Lwoff was born in Ainay-le-Château, Allier, in Auvergne, France, the son of Marie (Siminovitch), an Artist, and Solomon Lwoff, a Psychiatrist. He joined the Institute Pasteur in Paris when he was 19 years old. In 1932, he finished his PhD and, with the help of a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, moved to the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Medical Research of Heidelberg to Otto Meyerhof, where he did research on the development of flagellates. Another Rockefeller grant allowed him go to the University of Cambridge in 1937. In 1938, he was appointed departmental head at the Institut Pasteur, where he did groundbreaking research on bacteriophages, microbiota and on the poliovirus.

1960

He was awarded numerous prizes from the French Académie des Sciences, the Grand Prix Charles-Leopold Mayer, the Leeuwenhoek Medal of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1960 and the Keilin Medal of the British Biochemical Society in 1964. He was awarded a Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1965 for the discovery of the mechanism that some viruses (which he named proviruses) use to infect bacteria. Throughout his career he partnered with his wife Marguerite Lwoff although he gained considerably more recognition. Lwoff was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (ForMemRS) in 1958.