Hartmut Michel

About Hartmut Michel

Who is it?: Biochemist
Birth Day: July 18, 1948
Birth Place: Ludwigsburg, Germany, German
Birth Sign: Leo
Alma mater: University of Tübingen
Known for: Crystallisation of membrane proteins
Spouse(s): Elena Olkhova
Awards: Max Delbruck Prize (1986) Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize (1986) Nobel Prize in Chemistry (1988) ForMemRS (2005)
Fields: Biochemistry
Institutions: Max Planck Institute for Biophysics
Website: www.biophys.mpg.de/en/michel.html

Hartmut Michel Net Worth

Hartmut Michel was bornon July 18, 1948 in Ludwigsburg, Germany, German, is Biochemist. Hartmut Michel is a German biochemist who was conferred with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1988 for finding success with the crystallization of membrane proteins and elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the photosynthetic reaction centre from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis. He shared the prize with Robert Huber and Johann Deisenhofer. Photosynthesis is the most important chemical reaction in the world. Research conducted by Hartmut Michel, Robert Huber and Johann Deisenhofer helped in achieving a major breakthrough that helped in the understanding of the light reaction in photosynthesis. Apart from his work in the photosynthetic reaction centre, Michel was the first to observe the three-dimensional crystals in the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. In 1981, he became the first scientist to crystallise a membrane complex, the photosynthetic reaction system, and thereby make it accessible to X-ray structure analysis. His pioneering work has found application in various fields including medicine. Currently, he serves as the Director of the Department of Molecular Membrane Biology at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt am Main and as an Adjunct Professor at Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main.
Hartmut Michel is a member of Scientists

💰 Net worth: Under Review

Some Hartmut Michel images

Awards and nominations:

In 1986, he received the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, which is the highest honour awarded in German research. In 1988, he received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. He received the Bijvoet Medal at the Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research of Utrecht University in 1989. He became a foreign member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1995. He was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (ForMemRS) in 2005.

Biography/Timeline

1948

He was born on 18 July 1948 in Ludwigsburg. After compulsory military Service, he studied biochemistry at the University of Tübingen, working for his final year at Dieter Oesterhelt’s laboratory on ATPase activity of halobacteria.

1986

In 1986, he received the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, which is the highest honour awarded in German research. In 1988, he received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. He received the Bijvoet Medal at the Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research of Utrecht University in 1989. He became a foreign member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1995. He was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (ForMemRS) in 2005.

1987

Since 1987 he has been Director of the Molecular Membrane Biology department at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysics in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, and professor of biochemistry at the Goethe University Frankfurt.

1988

Hartmut later worked on the crystallisation of membrane proteins - essential for their structure elucidation by X-ray crystallography. He received the Nobel Prize jointly with Johann Deisenhofer and Robert Huber in 1988. Together with Michel and Huber, Deisenhofer determined the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex found in certain photosynthetic bacteria. This membrane protein complex, called a photosynthetic reaction center, was known to play a crucial role in initiating a simple type of photosynthesis. Between 1982 and 1985, the three Scientists used X-ray crystallography to determine the exact arrangement of the more than 10,000 atoms that make up the protein complex. Their research increased the general understanding of the mechanisms of photosynthesis, revealed similarities between the photosynthetic processes of plants and bacteria and established a methodology for crystallising membrane proteins.