Harry Shannon Net Worth

Harry Shannon was born on December 04, 1948 in  Saginaw, Michigan, United States, is Actor, Soundtrack. Born and raised on a farm in Michigan in 1890, Irish-American character actor Harry Shannon had the credentials for becoming a staple player in westerns. He started off his career traveling around with repertory and stock companies and developed his musical abilities in tent shows, burlesque houses and such tuneful Broadway shows as "Oh, Kay!" (1926), "Hold Everything" (1928), "Simple Simon" (1931), and "Pardon My English" (1933). A company member of Joseph Schildkraut's Hollywood Theater Guild, Shannon broke into films at the advent of sound and started things off in comedy film shorts opposite such celebrated players as Bert Lahr, Shemp Howard, and Leon Errol. In the 1940s Shannon established himself in feature-length movies and although he remained a minor, second-string player, he proved himself a durable presence in westerns usually remaining on the good side of the law as sheriffs and bucolic dads. In light-hearted entertainment he could be found as a friendly Irish cop or bartender. He made a slight but memorable impression as Kane's alcoholic father in the classic Citizen Kane (1941) while his last role would be as the grandfather in the musical Gypsy (1962). In between were small parts in such notable films as The Sullivans (1944), The Jolson Story (1946), High Noon (1952), Touch of Evil (1958) and The Buccaneer (1959). 1950s TV westerns such as "Cheyenne," "Have Gun, Will Travel," Rawhide" and "Gunsmoke" made consistent use of his rustic demeanor. Shannon died in 1964 at age 74.
Harry Shannon is a member of Actor

Age, Biography and Wiki

Who is it? Actor, Soundtrack
Birth Day December 04, 1948
Birth Place  Saginaw, Michigan, United States
Age 72 YEARS OLD
Birth Sign Cancer
Occupation Novelist, songwriter, entertainer
Education Newport University
Genre Mystery, Horror
Notable awards Nominated for Prime Time Emmy; Nominated for Bram Stoker Award for short story "Night Nurse"; Best Dark Scribble from Dark Scribe Magazine for "Night Nurse"; Tombstone Award for Best Small Press Novel "Night of the Werewolf"; ASCAP Country Music Awards in 1976 "Cowboy" (Eddy Arnold) and 1978 for "So Good, So Rare, So Fine" (Freddy Hart)
Spouse Wendy Kramer
Children Paige Emerson Shannon

💰 Net worth: Under Review

Some Harry Shannon images

Biography/Timeline

1950

Raised in Reno, Shannon moved to Pomona, California in the late 1950s, where he attended Ganesha High School. After graduation, he joined the singing group The Kids Next Door, touring colleges around the US, playing casino and show rooms and performing on variety television shows. He was also a member of The Back Porch Majority and did commercials for Ford Motor Company with The Going Thing.

1975

Shannon signed with ATV Music Group in 1975 and eventually became Executive Director of the company. He co-wrote a number of songs recorded by artists such as Eddy Arnold (Cowboy), Reba McEntire (Small Two Bedroom Starter), Engelbert Humperdinck (Love You Back To Sleep), and Glen Campbell (Why Don't We Just Sleep On It Tonight). During this period he collaborated extensively with Emmy winner Billy Goldenberg, and was nominated for an Emmy Award for his lyrics to the 1982 song "Just a Little More Love" from the CBS TV film "The Gift of Life." Shannon and Klee recorded six duet albums and performed at a number of concerts and on television shows in Switzerland from 1979 through 1995.

1988

Mr. Shannon was also Vice President, Music for Carolco Pictures, Inc. from 1988 to 1992, working on motion pictures such as Terminator 2: Judgment Day, Rambo III, Red Heat, Mountains of the Moon and several television films. After leaving Carolco, he was Music Supervisor on the hit films Basic Instinct and Universal Soldier. He left the entertainment Business and has a MA in Psychology from Newport University.

2001

Harry Shannon is now a counselor in private practice in Studio City, California. Many of his clients are entertainment professionals. He began writing fiction in 2001. His short stories have been published in Cemetery Dance and a number of other magazines.