Guru Har Rai

About Guru Har Rai

Who is it?: Seventh Sikh Guru
Birth Day: January 16, 1630
Died On: October 6, 1661 (1661-10-07) (aged 31)\nKiratpur Sahib, Mughal Empire (Present day India)
Birth Sign: Aquarius
Religion: Sikhism
Other names: The Seventh Master
Spouse: Mata Krishen Devi
Children: Baba Ram Rai and Guru Har Krishan
Parents: Baba Gurditta (father) Mata Nihal Kaur (mother)
Period in office: 1644–1661
Predecessor: Guru Hargobind
Successor: Guru Har Krishan

Guru Har Rai Net Worth

Guru Har Rai was bornon January 16, 1630, is Seventh Sikh Guru. Guru Har Rai was the seventh of the ten Sikh Gurus. Even though he died at the young age of 31, he made many significant contributions to the religion of Sikhism within his short life. Known to be a very compassionate and kind person, he was concerned not only about the welfare of human beings, but also that of the animals. In fact he was so soft hearted that he even helped to heal the son of Shah Jahan from an almost fatal illness despite the hostility the Mughals had shown to the guru’s predecessors. Har Rai was born as the grandson of the sixth Sikh guru, Hargobind. Wise and compassionate from a young age, he was Guru Hargobind’s favorite grandchild. Guru Hargobind nominated him as his successor at the time of his death. Upon assuming the Guru Gaddi, Guru Har Rai continued with the military tradition of maintaining a strong army even though he never indulged in any direct political or armed war with the Mughal Empire. He also established an Ayurvedic hospital and a research center at Kiratpur Sahib. Even though the relations between the Mughals and the Sikhs had been strained during the times of his predecessors, Guru Har Rai agreed immediately to help heal one of the sons of Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan when Shah Jahan made a desperate plea for help.
Guru Har Rai is a member of Spiritual & Religious Leaders

💰 Net worth: Under Review

Some Guru Har Rai images

Biography/Timeline

1640

Har Rai was born to Nihal Kaur and Baba Gurditta into a Sodhi household. His father died while he was 8 years old. At age 10, in 1640, Guru Har Rai was married to Mata Kishan Kaur (sometimes also referred to as Sulakhni) the daughter of Daya Ram. They had two children, Ram Rai and Har Krishan, the latter of whom became the eighth Guru.

1658

After Aurangzeb won the succession war in 1658, he summoned Guru Har Rai in 1660 to explain his support for the executed Dara Shikoh. Har Rai sent his elder son Ram Rai to represent him. Aurangzeb kept Ram Rai as hostage, questioned Ram Rai about a verse in the Adi Granth – the holy text of Sikhs at that time. Aurangzeb claimed that it disparaged the Muslims. Ram Rai changed the verse to appease Aurangzeb instead of standing by the Sikh scripture, an act for which Guru Har Rai is remembered for excommunicating his elder son, and nominating his younger son Har Krishan to succeed him. Har Krishan became the eighth Guru at age 5 after Guru Har Rai's death in 1661. Some Sikh literature spell his name as Hari Rai.

1660

Guru Har Rai provided medical care to Dara Shikoh, possibly when he had been poisoned by Mughal operatives. According to Mughal records, Har Rai provided other forms of support to Dara Shikoh as he and his brother Aurangzeb battled for rights to succession. Ultimately, Aurangzeb won, arrested Dara Shikoh and executed him on charges of apostasy from Islam. In 1660, Aurangzeb summoned Har Rai to appear before him to explain his relationship with Dara Shikoh.

2013

The organizational structure that had helped Sikhs to grow and resist the Mughal persecution had created new problems for Guru Har Rai. The donation Collectors, some of the Masands (local congregational leaders) led by Dhir Mal – the older brother of Guru Har Rai, all of them encouraged by the support of Shah Jahan, land grants and Mughal administration, had attempted to internally split the Sikhs into competing movements, start a parallel guruship, and thereby weaken the Sikh religion. Thus a part of the challenge for Guru Har Rai was to keep Sikhs united.

2018

Authentic literature about Guru Har Rai life and times are scarce, he left no texts of his own and some Sikh texts composed later spell his name as "Hari Rai". Some of the biographies of Guru Har Rai written in the 18th century such as by Kesar Singh Chhibber, and the 19th century Sikh literature are highly inconsistent.