David Harvey

About David Harvey

Who is it?: Professor of Anthropology & Geography
Birth Day: October 31, 1935
Birth Place: Gillingham, Kent, England, British
Birth Sign: Scorpio
Alma mater: St John's College, Cambridge
Known for: Marxist geography, quantitative revolution in geography, critical geography, right to the city
Fields: Geography, social theory, political economy
Thesis: Aspects of agricultural and rural change in Kent, 1800–1900 (1961)
Influences: Marx, Lefebvre, Engels
Influenced: Neil Smith, Andy Merrifield, Hosein Hataminejad, Erik Swyngedouw, Miguel Robles-Durán, the development of Marxist geography, critical geography and human geography as a discipline

David Harvey Net Worth

David Harvey was bornon October 31, 1935 in Gillingham, Kent, England, British, is Professor of Anthropology & Geography. David W. Harvey is a British Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at The Graduate Center of City University of New York (CUNY) and a famous author of several best-selling books. He received his doctorate in Geography from the University of Cambridge in 1961 and since then has been teaching and authoring several books and numerous influential essays and articles on geographical knowledge, urbanization in capitalist economy, urban planning, Marxism and social theory, environment and social change, ecological movements, etc. which have collectively contributed to the advancement of Modern Geography as a subject. His long illustrious academic career includes teaching positions at some of the leading universities of the world such as the University of Bristol and the University of Oxford, in England; and the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA. One of his most important teaching subjects for over 40 years now is Karl Marx's ‘Capital’ which makes him one of most prominent Marxist scholars in the past half century. He is also one of the world’s most frequently cited social scientists. In 2007, he was ranked as the 18thmost-cited author in the humanities and social sciences sections. Earlier, he was also ranked first in a study of the most-cited academic geographers in four English-speaking countries between 1984 and 1988. His latest publication is titled ‘The Ways of the World’ (2016).
David Harvey is a member of Intellectuals & Academics

💰 Net worth: $33 Million

David Harvey Instagram (@davidalanharvey)

Guadalajara. Wandering the city streets and countryside of México has been a career long passion. My magazine career really started in México with my work on the Maya in Yucatán and Chiapas. This led to 20 years of shooting/exploring the Spanish cultural diaspora. Yet after bouncing back and forth all that time between Spain and various countries in the Americas, I realized I could have shot a microcosm of the whole cultural mix by simply staying in México. It’s all there. Of course the only way we all learn things, is by doing the opposite of what we coulda shoulda woulda done. Maybe some of you have taken shortcuts to knowledge but I’ve learned everything the hard way. Whew! Yet still my book “Divided Soul” came out of it. So did “Cuba”. Alas , I still think I could have said all of it in México alone. Photographers don’t shoot encyclopedias. However, I always study the big picture. The history, the politics, the art, and current events. Yet mostly what I shoot isn’t apparently relevant to any of those things directly. Maybe the pictures all together mirror the essence. What I love most is being in a place like this. A bar/restaurant in the central market.That’s where you feel it. That’s when you know why you are a photographer. That’s where you can hear a love song in the morning.🎈

Guadalajara. Wandering the city streets and countryside of México has been a career long passion. My magazine career really started in México with my work on the Maya in Yucatán and Chiapas. This led to 20 years of shooting/exploring the Spanish cultural diaspora. Yet after bouncing back and forth all that time between Spain and various countries in the Americas, I realized I could have shot a microcosm of the whole cultural mix by simply staying in México. It’s all there. Of course the only way we all learn things, is by doing the opposite of what we coulda shoulda woulda done. Maybe some of you have taken shortcuts to knowledge but I’ve learned everything the hard way. Whew! Yet still my book “Divided Soul” came out of it. So did “Cuba”. Alas , I still think I could have said all of it in México alone. Photographers don’t shoot encyclopedias. However, I always study the big picture. The history, the politics, the art, and current events. Yet mostly what I shoot isn’t apparently relevant to any of those things directly. Maybe the pictures all together mirror the essence. What I love most is being in a place like this. A bar/restaurant in the central market.That’s where you feel it. That’s when you know why you are a photographer. That’s where you can hear a love song in the morning.🎈
❤️ 1,581 🕑 1 hour ago

Double exposure. Two lenses. 105/35. Kodachrome. Somewhere in Malaysia a long time ago.#malaysia

Double exposure. Two lenses. 105/35. Kodachrome. Somewhere in Malaysia a long time ago.#malaysia
❤️ 10,173 🕑 21 October, 12:42

My dear friend @kathrynbrolin in Havana 2017. Pro model, owner of @midheavendenim, photographer, activist, and at any moment about to be MOM. Dad is @joshbrolin who will I’m sure shoot the first pictures of their new baby girl. My love and best wishes Kathryn ,Josh, and “Bean” to be.❤️🎈

My dear friend @kathrynbrolin in Havana 2017. Pro model, owner of @midheavendenim, photographer, activist, and at any moment about to be MOM. Dad is @joshbrolin who will I’m sure shoot the first pictures of their new baby girl. My love and best wishes Kathryn ,Josh, and “Bean” to be.❤️🎈
❤️ 3,234 🕑 20 October, 19:48

Backstage, Chinese theater. Malaysia

Backstage, Chinese theater. Malaysia
❤️ 4,180 🕑 19 October, 23:29

”There’s nothing that can take the place of Sacred Harp music when it comes to praising the Lord” declared Dewey Williams, then 92-year-old patriarch of Sacred Harp singers. He has touched the hearts of many with his passion for music whose roots in America go back two centuries. Sacred harp, or shape note singing, takes its name from the Sacred Heart Handbook of 1844. An unaccompanied style marked by vibrant four-part harmony and steady rhythms , it uses geometric shapes to represent musical notes. For more than 70 years Dewey kept the glory shining, gathering with family/friends in homes and churches throughout southeastern Alabama to sing the old songs and share covered dish dinners. Dewey claimed “If I could just live to see the day when people realize that singing is the coming of angels, then I would have done my job”. One of my greatest rewards as a photographer has been meeting people like Dewey Williams who I photographed in Ozark, Alabama in 1991. A story appeared in @natgeo honoring a dozen recipients of the National Endowment for the Arts grant as “Living Treasures”. I worked for months on this story with my longtime collaborator Susan Welchman, Picture Editor at National Geographic. She also guided me through the Andrew Wyeth story I posted recently. Having a trusted collaborator is key. Susan rarely gave compliments. Forever skeptical. She would push and push and push me some more. Thank you my dear friend Susan. I sat in church with Dewey for two different services. Trying not to disturb, and at the same time I did need to make a photograph. Slowly I move. The harmonizing of the shape note singers really cannot be described. All I can say is that it went deep. So deep I honestly could not move after. Williams could lead all of the more than 500 songs in the Sacred Harp, including his favorite, “Amazing Grace”. Dewey said “If you follow me, you won’t get lost. I know right where I am going”. Dewey Williams. A man to remember.

”There’s nothing that can take the place of Sacred Harp music when it comes to praising the Lord” declared Dewey Williams, then 92-year-old patriarch of Sacred Harp singers. He has touched the hearts of many with his passion for music whose roots in America go back two centuries. Sacred harp, or shape note singing, takes its name from the Sacred Heart Handbook of 1844. An unaccompanied style marked by vibrant four-part harmony and steady rhythms , it uses geometric shapes to represent musical notes. For more than 70 years Dewey kept the glory shining, gathering with family/friends in homes and churches throughout southeastern Alabama to sing the old songs and share covered dish dinners. Dewey claimed “If I could just live to see the day when people realize that singing is the coming of angels, then I would have done my job”. One of my greatest rewards as a photographer has been meeting people like Dewey Williams who I photographed in Ozark, Alabama in 1991. A story appeared in @natgeo honoring a dozen recipients of the National Endowment for the Arts grant as “Living Treasures”. I worked for months on this story with my longtime collaborator Susan Welchman, Picture Editor at National Geographic. She also guided me through the Andrew Wyeth story I posted recently. Having a trusted collaborator is key. Susan rarely gave compliments. Forever skeptical. She would push and push and push me some more. Thank you my dear friend Susan. I sat in church with Dewey for two different services. Trying not to disturb, and at the same time I did need to make a photograph. Slowly I move. The harmonizing of the shape note singers really cannot be described. All I can say is that it went deep. So deep I honestly could not move after. Williams could lead all of the more than 500 songs in the Sacred Harp, including his favorite, “Amazing Grace”. Dewey said “If you follow me, you won’t get lost. I know right where I am going”. Dewey Williams. A man to remember.
❤️ 12,251 🕑 15 October, 16:11

Last week this dock was straight. The after shock of hurricane Michael barely touched us here in the Outer Banks. The winds were high yet not so unusual. However ,the soundside (bay) came up high simply because of a steady wind out of the west. I went out with a flashlight at 2am and my road looked like the Mississippi River! Nobody had been expecting anything at all. Still there was minor damage w wind/water taking out a private dock or two. It can seem precarious here, yet truth is it’s my paradise. That’s why when at 2am and the water was rising out front , I went back in the house and slipped easily into a deep sleep. #nagshead

Last week this dock was straight. The after shock of hurricane Michael barely touched us here in the Outer Banks. The winds were high yet not so unusual. However ,the soundside (bay) came up high simply because of a steady wind out of the west. I went out with a flashlight at 2am and my road looked like the Mississippi River! Nobody had been expecting anything at all. Still there was minor damage w wind/water taking out a private dock or two. It can seem precarious here, yet truth is it’s my paradise. That’s why when at 2am and the water was rising out front , I went back in the house and slipped easily into a deep sleep. #nagshead
❤️ 5,487 🕑 14 October, 23:45

Shelly Island came to us early in 2017 and she left later that year . Off Cape Hatteras NC a sand shoal island formed in the spring and was basically gone by fall. Such is the nature of the outer banks.. Yet for that one summer, Shelly was a magic spot for the locals. Because of its juxtaposition to the shoreline, the new island was good for surfing, kiteboarding, fishing, shell hunting, and just hanging..all in the same spot!! .. you could swim to it on high tide or wade to it on low...it’s hard to describe the magic feeling it gave to everyone...yet storms and currents took Shelly away as fast as she came ...that’s just the way it is here OBX.. #outerbanks

Shelly Island came to us early in 2017 and she left later that year . Off Cape Hatteras NC a sand shoal island formed in the spring and was basically gone by fall. Such is the nature of the outer banks.. Yet for that one summer, Shelly was a magic spot for the locals. Because of its juxtaposition to the shoreline, the new island was good for surfing, kiteboarding, fishing, shell hunting, and just hanging..all in the same spot!! .. you could swim to it on high tide or wade to it on low...it’s hard to describe the magic feeling it gave to everyone...yet storms and currents took Shelly away as fast as she came ...that’s just the way it is here OBX.. #outerbanks
❤️ 6,614 🕑 12 October, 17:46

I just left LA where I photographed friends @kathrynbrolin and @joshbrolin. The occasion? Well it’s a biggie. Literally. Kathryn is about to give birth. At any moment. A baby girl, now nicknamed “bean”, will soon grace this planet. I wanted pictures right before birth. The beauty of a pregnant woman. Kathryn, who I spent time shooting with in Cuba last year, is a model and runs her own company @midheavendenim designing jeans for women. She’s also an avid photographer, activist on many fronts, and why we met. Josh too had been all over Cuba and Mexico with his Leica M6/Tri-X  before he nailed it with his performance in the Coen Bros. film epic “No Country For Old Men”. One of my all time favorites. Then an Oscar nomination for his supporting role in “Milk” based on the true story of gay San Francisco city official Harvey Milk. Brolin hasn’t stopped since. In 2018 alone he had starring roles in “Avengers-Infinity Wars”, “Deadpool 2”, and “Sicario 2”. Josh also has his own production company, directs, and is working on a book. Read him.  He cares. An artist by nature. I can tell. @ale_jandram and I spent a glorious afternoon biking/skating/shooting with the Brolins on Venice Beach and the Santa Monica pier. Love was in the air all around. The videos here were shot by Josh and Alejandra. Ale and I have left LA sunshine and enjoying misty Seattle where I will present at @creativelive tomorrow. Waiting for the news, waiting for the news 🎈#venicebeach #jbkbstucktogether

I just left LA where I photographed friends @kathrynbrolin and @joshbrolin. The occasion? Well it’s a biggie. Literally. Kathryn is about to give birth. At any moment. A baby girl, now nicknamed “bean”, will soon grace this planet. I wanted pictures right before birth. The beauty of a pregnant woman. Kathryn, who I spent time shooting with in Cuba last year, is a model and runs her own company @midheavendenim designing jeans for women. She’s also an avid photographer, activist on many fronts, and why we met. Josh too had been all over Cuba and Mexico with his Leica M6/Tri-X  before he nailed it with his performance in the Coen Bros. film epic “No Country For Old Men”. One of my all time favorites. Then an Oscar nomination for his supporting role in “Milk” based on the true story of gay San Francisco city official Harvey Milk. Brolin hasn’t stopped since. In 2018 alone he had starring roles in “Avengers-Infinity Wars”, “Deadpool 2”, and “Sicario 2”. Josh also has his own production company, directs, and is working on a book. Read him.  He cares. An artist by nature. I can tell. @ale_jandram and I spent a glorious afternoon biking/skating/shooting with the Brolins on Venice Beach and the Santa Monica pier. Love was in the air all around. The videos here were shot by Josh and Alejandra. Ale and I have left LA sunshine and enjoying misty Seattle where I will present at @creativelive tomorrow. Waiting for the news, waiting for the news 🎈#venicebeach #jbkbstucktogether
❤️ 8,588 🕑 7 October, 23:48

6am reflection of my laptop screen in my Cadillac Hotel room window. The photo I took in the Outer Banks NC during our family reunion a few weeks ago is oddly juxtaposed over Venice Beach,CA. I was simply going over some work I will present to the @creativelive audience on Monday in Seattle. Street vendors/performers in Venice camp on the beach. I can’t figure out if it’s legal to do so or simply accepted. Yet there must be about 50 “camps” on Venice Beach. It’s a bit ironic that these homeless campers have a better view of the coast than do the waterfront homeowners. I’ve always been mentally prepared to live on the street. Things can go right, or things can go wrong. LA is a town full of storytellers. Some of them make films from their stories and some just keep it in their head. Schatzi the dog in this picture would be equally happy camping or on the terrace of the most extravagant home here. Relativity rules. Shades of gray. Sliding doors. Refections in a window.

6am reflection of my laptop screen in my Cadillac Hotel room window. The photo I took in the Outer Banks NC during our family reunion a few weeks ago is oddly juxtaposed over Venice Beach,CA. I was simply going over some work I will present to the  @creativelive audience on Monday in Seattle. Street vendors/performers in Venice camp on the beach. I can’t figure out if it’s legal to do so or simply accepted. Yet there must be about 50 “camps” on Venice Beach. It’s a bit ironic that these homeless campers have a better view of the coast than do the waterfront homeowners. I’ve always been mentally prepared to live on the street. Things can go right, or things can go wrong. LA is a town full of storytellers. Some of them make films from their stories and some just keep it in their head. Schatzi the dog in this picture would be equally happy camping or on the terrace of the most extravagant home here. Relativity rules. Shades of gray. Sliding doors. Refections in a window.
❤️ 3,348 🕑 7 October, 13:19

OBX #nagshead

OBX #nagshead
❤️ 7,557 🕑 6 October, 21:30

Soundside Road #nagshead #storm

Soundside Road #nagshead #storm
❤️ 6,586 🕑 1 October, 11:22

Remains of old ferry dock. Cape Charles, Va. #capecharles #chesapeakebay

Remains of old ferry dock. Cape Charles, Va. #capecharles #chesapeakebay
❤️ 4,947 🕑 29 September, 17:00

Biography/Timeline

1960

By the mid-1960s, he followed trends in the social sciences to employ quantitative methods, contributing to spatial science and positivist theory. Roots of this work were visible while he was at Cambridge: the Department of Geography also housed Richard Chorley, and Peter Haggett. His Explanation in Geography (1969) was a landmark text in the methodology and philosophy of geography, applying principles drawn from the philosophy of science in general to the field of geographical knowledge. But after its publication Harvey moved on again, to become concerned with issues of social injustice and the nature of the capitalist system itself. He has never returned to embrace the arguments made in Explanation, but still he conforms to the critique of absolute space and exceptionalism in geography of the regional-historical tradition that he saw as an outcome of Kantian synthetic a priori knowledge.

1970

Moving from Bristol University to Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore in the USA, he positioned himself centrally in the newly emerging field of radical and Marxist geography. Injustice, racism, and exploitation were visible in Baltimore, and activism around these issues was tangible in early 1970s East Coast, perhaps more so than in Britain. The journal Antipode was formed at Clark University; Harvey was one of the first contributors. The Boston Association of American Geographers meetings in 1971 were a landmark, with Harvey and others disrupting the traditional approach of their peers. In 1972, in a famous essay on ghetto formation, he argued for the creation of "revolutionary theory", theory "validated through revolutionary practice".

1973

Social Justice and the City (1973) expressed Harvey's position that geography could not remain 'objective' in the face of urban poverty and associated ills. It has been cited widely (over 6600 times, by 2017, in a discipline where 50 citations are rare), and it makes a significant contribution to Marxian theory by arguing that capitalism annihilates space to ensure its own reproduction. Dialectical materialism has guided his subsequent work, notably the theoretically sophisticated Limits to Capital (1982), which furthers the radical geographical analysis of capitalism, and several books on urban processes and urban life have followed it. The Condition of Postmodernity (1989), written while a Professor at Oxford, was a best-seller (the London The Independent named it as one of the fifty most important works of non-fiction to be published since 1945, and it is cited 30,000 times by 2017). It is a materialist critique of postmodern ideas and arguments, suggesting these actually emerge from contradictions within capitalism itself. Justice, Nature and the Geography of Difference (1996) focuses on social and environmental justice (although its dialectical perspective has attracted the ire of some Greens). Spaces of Hope (2000) has an utopian theme and indulges in speculative thinking about how an alternative world might look. His study of Second Empire Paris and the events surrounding the Paris Commune in Paris, Capital of Modernity, is undoubtedly his most elaborated historical-geographical work. The onset of US military action since 2001 has provoked a blistering critique – in The New Imperialism (2003) he argues that the war in Iraq allows US neo-conservatives to divert attention from the failures of capitalism 'at home'. His next work, A Brief History of Neoliberalism (2005), provides an historical examination of the theory and divergent practices of neoliberalism since the mid-1970s. This work conceptualises the neoliberalised global political economy as a system that benefits few at the expense of many, and which has resulted in the (re)creation of class distinction through what Harvey calls "accumulation by dispossession". His book The Enigma of Capital (2010) takes a long view of the contemporary economic crisis. Harvey explains how capitalism came to dominate the world and why it resulted in the financial crisis. He describes that the essence of capitalism is its amorality and lawlessness and to talk of a regulated, ethical capitalism is to make a fundamental error. A series of events linked to this book across London academic forums, such as the LSE, proved hugely popular and sparked a new interest in Harvey's work.

1990

Harvey resides in New York. He has a daughter Delfina born in January, 1990.

1993

Harvey returned to Johns Hopkins from Oxford in 1993, but spent increasing time elsewhere as a speaker and visitor, notably as a salaried Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics in the late 1990s. In 1996, he delivered the Ellen Churchill Semple lecture at UK Geography. He moved to the City University of New York in 2001 as a Distinguished Professor, now residing in its Department of Anthropology. He has spent most of his academic career in Anglo-America, with brief sojourns in France and a range of foreign visiting appointments (currently as acting Advisory Professor at Tongji University in Shanghai). He has supervised many PhD students. Several of these, such as Neil Smith, Richard Walker, Erik Swyngedouw, Michael Johns, Maarten Hajer, Patrick Bond, Melissa Wright, and Greg Ruiters now hold or held important academic positions themselves. In 2013 Harvey was asked by the Republic of Ecuador to help set up the National Strategic Center for the Right to the Territory (CENEDET), which he directed with the urbanist Miguel Robles-Durán until its alleged forced closure in 2017.

1998

David Harvey is widely recognized as a foundational scholar in urban geography. Harvey's books have been widely translated. He holds honorary doctorates from Roskilde (Denmark), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Faculty of Social Sciences at Uppsala University (Sweden), Ohio State University (USA), Lund University (Sweden) and the University of Kent (UK). Among other awards he has received the Anders Retzius Gold Medal of the Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography, the Patron's Medal of the Royal Geographical Society and the Vautrin Lud International Prize in Geography (France). He was made a fellow of the British Academy in 1998, and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2007. He is a member of the Interim Committee for the emerging International Organization for a Participatory Society.

2006

Critical response to Harvey's work has been sustained. In the early years, there was competition between Harvey and proponents of quantitative and non-politicized geography, notably Brian Berry. A recent critical appraisal (Castree & Gregory, 2006) explores some critiques of Harvey in detail. There have been several engagements from 2016 with the anarchist geographer, Prof. Simon Springer.

2007

In 2007, Harvey was listed as the 18th most-cited author of books in the humanities and social sciences in that year, as established by counting cites from academic journals in the Thomson Reuters ISI database. Some of the artists influenced by Harvey's work are Elisheva Levy in Israel and Theaster Gates in Chicago.

2019

Harvey attended Gillingham Grammar School for Boys and St John's College, Cambridge (for both his undergraduate and post-graduate studies). Harvey's early work, beginning with his PhD (on hops production in 19th century Kent), was historical in nature, emerging from a regional-historical tradition of inquiry widely used at Cambridge and in Britain at that time. Historical inquiry runs through his later works (for Example on Paris).

Some David Harvey images