Carlos Lehder

About Carlos Lehder

Who is it?: Drug Lord
Birth Day: September 07, 1949
Birth Place: Armenia, Colombia, Colombian
Birth Sign: Libra
Occupation: Drug trafficker Medellín Cartel,
Criminal charge: Murder, kidnapping, drug trafficking
Criminal penalty: Life imprisonment plus 135 years
Criminal status: Incarcerated

Carlos Lehder Net Worth

Carlos Lehder was bornon September 07, 1949 in Armenia, Colombia, Colombian, is Drug Lord. Carlos Lehder is a former Colombian drug lord who is currently imprisoned in United States. Lehder’s involvement in criminal activities started early on. When his father started selling used cars, Lehder gave his criminal touch to the business by selling stolen cars. It was while serving a sentence for car theft prison that Lehder was struck with the idea of drug trafficking. His ultimate scheme was to revolutionize the cocaine trade by transporting the drug to the United States, using small aircraft. Together, with Jung, a fellow prison inmate, Lehder formed the roots of what would become a magnanimously huge cocaine empire. He founded Medellin Cartel, a ruthless, highly organized Colombian drug cartel that operated with the sole objective of managing drug trafficking operations. He also founded a political party that forced Colombia to abrogate extradition. However, just as they say that there is no crime in the world that can exist for long; Lehder’s scandalous, illicit and immoral outings also timed out when Colombian government took a firm stand against drug dealers and traffickers! Carlos Lehder was arrested and imprisoned in United States prison and is currently serving his sentence.
Carlos Lehder is a member of Drug Lords

💰 Net worth: Under Review

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Biography/Timeline

1970

In the late 1970s, the Lehder-Jung partnership began to diverge, due to some combination of Lehder's megalomania and his secret scheming to secure a personal Bahamian island as an all-purpose headquarters for his operations.

1978

Lehder built a 3,300-foot (1,000 m) runway protected by radar, Bodyguards, and Doberman attack dogs for the fleet of aircraft under his command. In the glory days of his operation, 300 kilograms of cocaine would arrive on the island daily, and Lehder's personal wealth mounted into the billions. He accumulated such staggering wealth that on two occasions he offered to pay the Colombian external debt. In 1978, he made an offer to do so to President Alfonso López Michelsen, in exchange for a free space for drug trafficking; in 1982 through Escobar, by then a Colombian Congressman, Lehder did so again, this time in an attempt to prevent his extradition.

1981

Lehder was one of the founding members of Muerte a Secuestradores ("MAS"), a paramilitary group whose focus was to retaliate against the kidnappings of cartel members and their families by the guerrillas. His motivation to join the MAS was to retaliate against the M-19 guerrilla movement, which, on November 19 1981, attempted to kidnap him for a ransom; Lehder managed to escape from the kidnappers, though he was shot in the leg. He was one of the most important MAS and Medellin Cartel operators, and is considered to be one of the most important Colombian drug kingpins to have been successfully prosecuted in the United States.

1983

After Brian Ross's September 5 1983 report, on the U.S. television channel NBC, made public the corruption of Bahamian government Leaders, Lehder could not return to Norman's Cay. The government had frozen all his bank accounts and taken over his property and possessions, and he went from being a Billionaire to nearly bankrupt. While on the run in the jungle, he got sick with a fever. Escobar sent a helicopter for Lehder and brought him back to Medellín, where he received medical attention to save his life. Even so, he was left very weak. When Lehder recovered, Escobar hired him as a bodyguard.

1984

The April 30, 1984 assassination of Rodrigo Lara Bonilla, the Colombian Minister of Justice, initiated the beginning of the end for Lehder and the Medellín Cartel. Lara had campaigned against the cartel's activities, and his murder marked a change in Colombian politics. President Belisario Betancur, who had previously opposed extraditing any Colombian drug lords to the United States, announced that he was now willing to extradite. Lehder's was the top name on the crackdown list.

1987

Having captured one of the Cartel's most powerful members, the U.S. government used him as a source of information about the details of the Cartel's secret empire, which later proved useful in assisting the Colombian government to dismantle the Cartel. In 1987, Lehder was extradited to the United States, where he was tried and sentenced to life without parole, plus an additional 135 years. Now all of the other cartel Leaders knew what would happen if they were extradited, and soon afterward, the Medellín Cartel organizations split up. These smaller organizations, especially Escobar's, were later attacked by the Cali Cartel, the Colombian police/army, and soon by the U.S. government, as well. A violent war began as the Medellin Cartel Leaders tried to protect themselves by fighting back.

1992

In 1992, in exchange for Lehder's agreement to testify against Manuel Noriega, his sentence was reduced to a total of 55 years. Three years after that, Lehder wrote a letter to a Jacksonville federal district judge, complaining that the government had reneged on a deal to transfer him to a German prison. The letter was construed as a threat against the judge.

1995

Within weeks of sending that letter in the fall of 1995, Lehder was whisked away into the night, according to several protected witnesses at the Mesa Unit in Arizona. While many believe he could have been released, others disagree. Lehder's brother, Federico Guillermo Lehder, who operated on the periphery of the Business, might have been mistaken for Carlos, thus causing the reports of Carlos' being free and living overseas.

2005

Lehder's ongoing legal battles confirm that he remains imprisoned in the U.S. He is not likely to be released anytime soon. On July 22 2005, he appeared in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit to contest his sentence. Lehder appeared pro se, arguing that the United States failed to carry out its obligations under a cooperation agreement he had entered into with the United States Attorney's Office, after he held up his end of the deal. (United States v. Lehder-Rivas, 136 Fed. Appx. 324; 2005).

2007

In May 2007, he requested the Colombian Supreme Court to order the Colombian government to request his release from the United States because of the violations of his cooperation agreement.

2008

In May 2008, Lehder's Lawyer declared to El Tiempo that a habeas corpus petition had been filed, alleging that Lehder's cooperation agreement had been violated and that "a court in Washington" had less than 30 days to respond to the notice.

2015

On June 24 2015, Lehder wrote a letter to the President of Colombia Juan Manuel Santos, in which he requests mediation with the United States to be allowed to return to Colombia.

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