Archer Martin

About Archer Martin

Who is it?: Chemist
Birth Day: March 01, 1910
Birth Place: London, England, British
Died On: 28 July 2002(2002-07-28) (aged 92)\nLlangarron, Wales
Birth Sign: Aries
Alma mater: Peterhouse, Cambridge
Known for: Gas chromatography
Awards: Nobel Prize in Chemistry (1952) John Price Wetherill Medal (1959)
Fields: Chemistry
Institutions: University of Sussex, University of Houston, Texas

Archer Martin Net Worth

Archer Martin was bornon March 01, 1910 in London, England, British, is Chemist. Archer John Porter Martin was a British chemist who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1952 for the development of modern chromatography technique which helps to separate different compounds in a mixture. He shared the prize with another biochemist, Richard Lawrence Millington Sygne. Before his technique was adopted by others, it had been very difficult to separate the compounds as chemical reactions never produced any clean and pure products. To obtain the compounds in the pure form even repetitive, distillation, crystallization and the extraction of solvents were not sufficient. Though Mikhail Tswett, a Russian-Italian chemist had invented the first method of absorption chromatography in the early twentieth century, the method never became popular. On the other hand Martin invented three different types of chromatography techniques, namely partition, paper and gas-liquid chromatography, which became very popular and are still used today. By the end of 1953 his chromatography technique had spread like wildfire because the academia and the industry had been waiting long for a technique that could separate relatively volatile compounds cleanly and quickly. The oil and the gas companies benefited the most from his discoveries. He acted as a consultant to many firms during the later years of his career.
Archer Martin is a member of Scientists

💰 Net worth: $1.3 Million

Some Archer Martin images

Awards and nominations:

Archer Martin shared the 1952 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the invention of partition chromatography with Richard Synge.

Archer Martin’s 1954 paper with A. T. James, “Gas-Liquid Chromatography: A Technique for the Analysis and Identification of Volatile Materials” reported the discovery of gas-liquid chromatography. This publication was honored by a Citation for Chemical Breakthrough Award from the Division of History of Chemistry of the American Chemical Society presented in 2016 to the Francis Crick Institute. The research was actually performed at the National Institute for Medical Research in Mill Hill, which became the Francis Crick Institute in 2015.

Martin was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1950, and made a CBE in 1960.

Biography/Timeline

1938

Working first in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory, he moved to the Dunn Nutritional Laboratory, and in 1938 moved to Wool Industries Research Institution in Leeds. He was head of the biochemistry division of Boots Pure Drug Company from 1946 to 1948, when he joined the Medical Research Council. There, he was appointed head of the physical chemistry division of the National Institute for Medical Research in 1952, and was chemical consultant from 1956 to 1959.

1943

In 1943 he married Judith Bagenal (1918-2006), and together they had two sons and three daughters. In the last years of his life he suffered from Alzheimer's disease.

1950

Martin was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1950, and made a CBE in 1960.

1952

Archer Martin shared the 1952 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the invention of partition chromatography with Richard Synge.

2014

He published far fewer papers than the typical Nobel winners—only 70 in all—but his ninth paper won the Nobel. The University of Houston dropped him from its chemistry faculty in 1979 (when he was 69 years old) because he was not publishing enough.

2019

Archer Martin’s 1954 paper with A. T. James, “Gas-Liquid Chromatography: A Technique for the Analysis and Identification of Volatile Materials” reported the discovery of gas-liquid chromatography. This publication was honored by a Citation for Chemical Breakthrough Award from the Division of History of Chemistry of the American Chemical Society presented in 2016 to the Francis Crick Institute. The research was actually performed at the National Institute for Medical Research in Mill Hill, which became the Francis Crick Institute in 2015.