Alexander the Great Net Worth

Alexander the Great was born in Pella, Greek, is Emperor of Greece. Alexander the Great, also known as Alexander III of Macedon, was the king of Macedonia from 336 to 323 B.C. He was the conqueror of the Persian Empire and is considered to be one of the greatest military geniuses of all times. Born as the son of Philip II, King of Macedonia, he spent his early years observing the administration of his father and witnessed how the king transformed Macedonia into a great military power. Brave and courageous from an early age, Alexander first displayed his prowess when he successfully tamed an unruly stallion when he was just 12. As a young boy he had the good fortune of being tutored by the great Greek philosopher, Aristotle, who imbibed in Alexander a love for knowledge and stimulated his interest in the fields of science, medicine, literature and philosophy. Alexander ascended the throne at the age of 20 following the assassination of his father. His father had been a great conqueror and being his son, Alexander was determined to take forward his legacy. He embarked on a series of extensive military campaigns and created one of the largest empires of the ancient world by the time he was 30
Alexander the Great is a member of Military Leaders

Age, Biography and Wiki

Who is it? Emperor of Greece
Birth Place Pella, Greek
Died On 10 or 11 June 323 BC (aged 32)\nBabylon
Birth Sign Leo
Reign 331–323 BC
Predecessor New office
Successor Alexander IV Philip III
SuccessorPrenomen  (Praenomen)NomenHorus nameNebty nameGolden Horus Alexander IV Philip III Royal titulary Prenomen  (Praenomen) stp.n-rꜤ mrj-jmn Setepenre meryamun Chosen by Ra, beloved by Amun Nomen Ꜥlwksjndrs Aluxsindres Alexandros Horus name mk-kmt Mekemet Protector of Egypt Second Horus name: ḥḳꜢ-ḳnj tkn-ḫꜢswt Heqaqeni tekenkhasut The brave ruler who has attacked foreign lands Third Horus name: ḥḳꜢ ḥḳꜢw nw tꜢ (r) ḏr-f Heqa heqau nu ta (er) djeref The ruler of the rulers of the entire land Fourth Horus name: ṯmꜢ-Ꜥ Tjema'a The sturdy-armed one Nebty name mꜢj wr-pḥty jṯ ḏww tꜢw ḫꜢswt Mai werpehty itj dju tau khasut The lion, great of might, who takes possession of mountains, lands, and deserts Golden Horus kꜢ (nḫt) ḫwj bꜢḳ(t) ḥḳꜢ wꜢḏ(-wr) šnw n jtn Ka (nakht) khui baq(et) heqa wadj(wer) shenu en Aten The (strong) bull who protects Egypt, the ruler of the sea and of what the sun encircles stp.n-rꜤ mrj-jmn Setepenre meryamun Chosen by Ra, beloved by Amun stp.n-rꜤ mrj-jmn Setepenre meryamun Chosen by Ra, beloved by Amun Ꜥlwksjndrs Aluxsindres Alexandros Ꜥlwksjndrs Aluxsindres Alexandros mk-kmt Mekemet Protector of Egypt Second Horus name: ḥḳꜢ-ḳnj tkn-ḫꜢswt Heqaqeni tekenkhasut The brave ruler who has attacked foreign lands Third Horus name: ḥḳꜢ ḥḳꜢw nw tꜢ (r) ḏr-f Heqa heqau nu ta (er) djeref The ruler of the rulers of the entire land Fourth Horus name: ṯmꜢ-Ꜥ Tjema'a The sturdy-armed one mk-kmt Mekemet Protector of Egypt Second Horus name: ḥḳꜢ-ḳnj tkn-ḫꜢswt Heqaqeni tekenkhasut The brave ruler who has attacked foreign lands Third Horus name: ḥḳꜢ ḥḳꜢw nw tꜢ (r) ḏr-f Heqa heqau nu ta (er) djeref The ruler of the rulers of the entire land Fourth Horus name: ṯmꜢ-Ꜥ Tjema'a The sturdy-armed one mꜢj wr-pḥty jṯ ḏww tꜢw ḫꜢswt Mai werpehty itj dju tau khasut The lion, great of might, who takes possession of mountains, lands, and deserts mꜢj wr-pḥty jṯ ḏww tꜢw ḫꜢswt Mai werpehty itj dju tau khasut The lion, great of might, who takes possession of mountains, lands, and deserts kꜢ (nḫt) ḫwj bꜢḳ(t) ḥḳꜢ wꜢḏ(-wr) šnw n jtn Ka (nakht) khui baq(et) heqa wadj(wer) shenu en Aten The (strong) bull who protects Egypt, the ruler of the sea and of what the sun encircles kꜢ (nḫt) ḫwj bꜢḳ(t) ḥḳꜢ wꜢḏ(-wr) šnw n jtn Ka (nakht) khui baq(et) heqa wadj(wer) shenu en Aten The (strong) bull who protects Egypt, the ruler of the sea and of what the sun encircles
Spouse Roxana of Bactria Stateira II of Persia Parysatis II of Persia
Issue Alexander IV
Full name Full name Alexander III of Macedon Alexander III of Macedon
Greek Μέγας Ἀλέξανδρος Mégas Aléxandros lit. 'Great Alexander' Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας Aléxandros ho Mégas lit. 'Alexander the Great'
Dynasty Argead
Father Philip II of Macedon
Mother Olympias of Epirus
Religion Greek polytheism

💰 Net worth: Under Review

Some Alexander the Great images

Famous Quotes:

At the wedding of Cleopatra, whom Philip fell in love with and married, she being much too young for him, her uncle Attalus in his drink desired the Macedonians would implore the gods to give them a lawful successor to the kingdom by his niece. This so irritated Alexander, that throwing one of the cups at his head, "You villain," said he, "what, am I then a bastard?" Then Philip, taking Attalus's part, rose up and would have run his son through; but by good fortune for them both, either his over-hasty rage, or the wine he had drunk, made his foot slip, so that he fell down on the floor. At which Alexander reproachfully insulted over him: "See there," said he, "the man who makes preparations to pass out of Europe into Asia, overturned in passing from one seat to another."

— Plutarch, describing the feud at Philip's wedding.

Biography/Timeline

1920

Alexander's legacy includes the cultural diffusion and syncretism which his conquests engendered, such as Greco-Buddhism. He founded some twenty cities that bore his name, most notably Alexandria in Egypt. Alexander's settlement of Greek colonists and the resulting spread of Greek culture in the east resulted in a new Hellenistic civilization, aspects of which were still evident in the traditions of the Byzantine Empire in the mid-15th century AD and the presence of Greek speakers in central and far eastern Anatolia until the 1920s. Alexander became legendary as a classical hero in the mold of Achilles, and he features prominently in the history and mythic traditions of both Greek and non-Greek cultures. He became the measure against which military Leaders compared themselves, and military academies throughout the world still teach his tactics. He is often ranked among the most influential people in history.

1921

Alexander's legacy extended beyond his military conquests. His campaigns greatly increased contacts and trade between East and West, and vast areas to the east were significantly exposed to Greek civilization and influence. Some of the cities he founded became major cultural centers, many surviving into the 21st century. His chroniclers recorded valuable information about the areas through which he marched, while the Greeks themselves got a sense of belonging to a world beyond the Mediterranean.

1973

After the death of Spitamenes and his marriage to Roxana (Raoxshna in Old Iranian) to cement relations with his new satrapies, Alexander turned to the Indian subcontinent. He invited the chieftains of the former satrapy of Gandhara (a region presently straddling eastern Afghanistan and northern Pakistan), to come to him and submit to his authority. Omphis (Indian name Ambhi), the ruler of Taxila, whose kingdom extended from the Indus to the Hydaspes (Jhelum), complied, but the chieftains of some hill clans, including the Aspasioi and Assakenoi sections of the Kambojas (known in Indian texts also as Ashvayanas and Ashvakayanas), refused to submit. Ambhi hastened to relieve Alexander of his apprehension and met him with valuable presents, placing himself and all his forces at his disposal. Alexander not only returned Ambhi his title and the gifts but he also presented him with a wardrobe of "Persian robes, gold and silver ornaments, 30 horses and 1,000 talents in gold". Alexander was emboldened to divide his forces, and Ambhi assisted Hephaestion and Perdiccas in constructing a bridge over the Indus where it bends at Hund (Fox 1973), supplied their troops with provisions, and received Alexander himself, and his whole army, in his capital city of Taxila, with every demonstration of friendship and the most liberal hospitality.

1998

Several natural causes (diseases) have been suggested, including malaria and typhoid fever. A 1998 article in the New England Journal of Medicine attributed his death to typhoid fever complicated by bowel perforation and ascending paralysis. Another recent analysis suggested pyogenic (infectious) spondylitis or meningitis. Other illnesses fit the symptoms, including acute pancreatitis and West Nile virus. Natural-cause theories also tend to emphasize that Alexander's health may have been in general decline after years of heavy drinking and severe wounds. The anguish that Alexander felt after Hephaestion's death may also have contributed to his declining health.

2003

The strongest argument against the poison theory is the fact that twelve days passed between the start of his illness and his death; such long-acting poisons were probably not available. However, in a 2003 BBC documentary investigating the death of Alexander, Leo Schep from the New Zealand National Poisons Centre proposed that the plant white hellebore (Veratrum album), which was known in antiquity, may have been used to poison Alexander. In a 2014 manuscript in the journal Clinical Toxicology, Schep suggested Alexander's wine was spiked with Veratrum album, and that this would produce poisoning symptoms that match the course of events described in the Alexander Romance. Veratrum album poisoning can have a prolonged course and it was suggested that if Alexander was poisoned, Veratrum album offers the most plausible cause. Another poisoning explanation put forward in 2010 proposed that the circumstances of his death were compatible with poisoning by water of the river Styx (modern-day Mavroneri in Arcadia, Greece) that contained calicheamicin, a dangerous compound produced by bacteria.

2009

Greek Historian Arrian (Lucius Flavius Arrianus 'Xenophon' c. 86 – c. 160 AD) described Alexander as:

2013

Some of the most pronounced effects of Hellenization can be seen in Afghanistan and India, in the region of the relatively late-rising Greco-Bactrian Kingdom (250–125 BC) (in modern Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Tajikistan) and the Indo-Greek Kingdom (180 BC – 10 AD) in modern Afghanistan and India. There on the newly formed Silk Road Greek culture apparently hybridized with Indian, and especially Buddhist culture. The resulting syncretism known as Greco-Buddhism heavily influenced the development of Buddhism and created a culture of Greco-Buddhist art. These Greco-Buddhist kingdoms sent some of the first Buddhist missionaries to China, Sri Lanka, and the Mediterranean (Greco-Buddhist monasticism). Some of the first and most influential figurative portrayals of the Buddha appeared at this time, perhaps modeled on Greek statues of Apollo in the Greco-Buddhist style. Several Buddhist traditions may have been influenced by the ancient Greek religion: the concept of Boddhisatvas is reminiscent of Greek Divine heroes, and some Mahayana ceremonial practices (burning incense, gifts of flowers, and food placed on altars) are similar to those practiced by the ancient Greeks; however, similar practices were also observed amongst the native Indic culture. One Greek king, Menander I, probably became Buddhist, and was immortalized in Buddhist literature as 'Milinda'. The process of Hellenization also spurred trade between the east and west. For Example, Greek astronomical instruments dating to the 3rd century BC were found in the Greco-Bactrian city of Ai Khanoum in modern-day Afghanistan, while the Greek concept of a spherical earth surrounded by the spheres of planets eventually supplanted the long-standing Indian cosmological belief of a disc consisting of four continents grouped around a central mountain (Mount Meru) like the petals of a flower. The Yavanajataka (lit. Greek astronomical treatise) and Paulisa Siddhanta texts depict the influence of Greek astronomical ideas on Indian astronomy.

2014

Alexander was erudite and patronized both arts and sciences. However, he had little interest in Sports or the Olympic games (unlike his father), seeking only the Homeric ideals of honour (timê) and glory (kudos). He had great charisma and force of personality, characteristics which made him a great leader. His unique abilities were further demonstrated by the inability of any of his generals to unite Macedonia and retain the Empire after his death—only Alexander had the ability to do so.

2015

The core of the Hellenistic culture promulgated by the conquests was essentially Athenian. The close association of men from across Greece in Alexander's army directly led to the emergence of the largely Attic-based "koine", or "common" Greek dialect. Koine spread throughout the Hellenistic world, becoming the lingua franca of Hellenistic lands and eventually the ancestor of modern Greek. Furthermore, town planning, education, local government, and art current in the Hellenistic period were all based on Classical Greek ideals, evolving into distinct new forms commonly grouped as Hellenistic. Aspects of Hellenistic culture were still evident in the traditions of the Byzantine Empire in the mid-15th century.