Albert Anker

About Albert Anker

Who is it?: Painter
Birth Day: April 01, 1831
Birth Place: Ins, Swiss
Died On: July 16, 1910(1910-07-16) (aged 79)\nIns, Switzerland
Birth Sign: Taurus
Occupation: Painter
Spouse(s): Anna Rüfli
Children: Louise, Marie, Maurice and Cécile
Parent(s): Samuel Anker, Marianne

Albert Anker Net Worth

Albert Anker was bornon April 01, 1831 in Ins, Swiss, is Painter. Albert Samuel Anker is regarded as the “national painter” of Switzerland. His meticulous paintings of Swiss rural life endeared him to the public and during his heydays, he was regarded as the most popular artist. His works captured the daily and social life of the rustics in the picturesque villages of Switzerland. While these captured the imagination of the public, his portraits charmed the critics. Indeed, his portraits and still-life are what cemented his enduring legacy. Unlike many of his contemporaries, his documentation of the social life of villagers was never judgmental. Rather he portrayed them as plain and unpretentious. Anker also worked on many still-lives, which are considered to be among his most important works. He strongly believed in a stable word order, which are apparent in his works because of their realist solidity. No wonder, he is considered as the greatest Swiss painter of the 19th century. If you want to know more on this fabulous painter, continue reading the biography given below.
Albert Anker is a member of Painters

💰 Net worth: Under Review

Some Albert Anker images

Biography/Timeline

1845

Born in Ins as the son of Veterinarian Samuel Anker (then a member of the constituent assembly of the Canton of Bern), Anker attended school in Neuchâtel, where he and Auguste Bachelin, later a fellow Artist, took early drawing lessons with Louis Wallinger in 1845–48. In 1849–51, he attended the Gymnasium Kirchenfeld (de) in Bern, graduating with the Matura. Afterwards, he studied theology, beginning in 1851 in Bern and continuing at the university of Halle, Germany. But in Germany he was inspired by the great art collections, and in 1854 he convinced his father to agree to an artistic career. In Neuchâtel he got his name Albert, because it was much easier to pronounce for his French speaking classmates.

1855

Anker moved to Paris, where he studied with Charles Gleyre and attended the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts in 1855–60. He installed a studio in the attic of his parents' house and participated regularly in exhibitions in Switzerland and in Paris. Anker married Anna Rüfli in 1864, and they had six children together; the four children who did not die at an early age – Louise, Marie, Maurice and Cécile – appear in some of Anker's paintings. In 1866, he was awarded a gold medal at the Paris Salon for Schlafendes Mädchen im Walde (1865) und Schreibunterricht (1865); in 1878 he was made a knight of the Légion d'honneur. In 1870–74 he was a member of the Grand Council of Bern, where he advocated the construction of the Kunstmuseum Bern.

1889

Apart from his regular Wintertime stays in Paris, Anker frequently travelled to Italy and other European countries. In 1889–93 and 1895–98 he was a member of the Swiss Federal Art Commission and in 1900 he received an honorary doctorate from the University of Bern. A stroke in 1901 reduced his ability to work. Only after his death in 1910 was there a first exposition dedicated to him, held at the Musée d'art et d'histoire in Neuchâtel.

1980

Many Swiss postage stamps and other media have incorporated Anker's work. His studio in Ins has been preserved as a museum by the Albert Anker Foundation. One of Anker's greatest admirers and Collectors is former Swiss Federal Councillor Christoph Blocher, since the 1980s Switzerland's most influential conservative Politician, who also published an apologetic essay on Anker.

2019

Albert Anker's work made him Switzerland's most popular genre Painter of the 19th century, and his paintings have continued to enjoy a great popularity due to their general accessibility. Indeed, as a student, Anker summed up his approach to art as follows: "One has to shape an idea in one's imagination, and then one has to make that idea accessible to the people."